Finland’s job market

A group of people sits on the sidewalk outside.

Markus Sommers / Business Finland

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Looking for information on the job market in Finland? Here are the answers to some commonly asked questions.

Can foreigners find work in Finland?

Yes. Currently, foreign workers are playing a major role in addressing Finland’s labor shortage, and the number of international talents is growing steadily.
A woman smiles at the camera while working in her office.

Credits: N2 Albiino / Helsinki Partners

Finland’s vibrant start-up culture is responsible for global success stories such as Angry Birds, Supercell, and Wolt.

What is the overall job market like?

The population of Finland is roughly 5.5 million. With the Baby Boomer generation at or near retirement age, the country offers plenty of opportunities for foreign professionals. In fact, the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment recently predicted that employment in Finland will continue to improve through 2024 – despite recent uncertainty created by Russia’s war on Ukraine. The outlook on new jobs and employment is similarly good. The unemployment rate is expected to fall to 6.4% in 2022 then drop to 5.9% by 2024.

Do I need a residence permit?

As a rule of thumb, yes. If you plan to work or start a business in Finland, you will usually need a residence permit. Your residence permit depends on the type of work you do. Visit the residence permit section to access the application finder and learn about fast-track service.

Which jobs are in-demand in Finland?

If you’re a skilled worker in tech, you’re in luck – international talent in this field is highly sought after and many companies offer extra perks and benefits to attract top candidates. 

 

But tech isn’t the only industry that’s hiring. Companies in bioeconomy, health technology, electronics, cybersecurity, manufacturing, construction, and many other fields heavily recruit talent from abroad, and currently, there is also a shortage of healthcare workers.

A female scientist works in a laboratory.

Credits: Keksi Agency / Helsinki Partners

Currently, Finnish innovators are working with healthcare technology that supports post-pandemic recovery.

What type of salary can I expect?

According to Statistics Finland’s 2019 data, the median monthly income for all full-time wage-earning and salaried workers was 3,139 euros. With that said, factors such as industry, role, and location will affect your compensation.

OccupationYearly salary estimate (in EUR)
System Development Manager48 625
Senior Programmer 55 223
Senior Software Development Engineer63 618
Software Development Engineer51 622
Software Development Manager67 859
Automotive Production Assembler24 790
Test Automation Engineer51 622
Robotics Engineer51 622
IT Security Specialist67 859
Security Engineer46 417
Welder40 746
Civil engineer46 680
Video Game Designer46 417
Engineer45 689
Business Finland & fDi Benchmark, a service from the Financial Times Limited 2022.

What kind of taxes will I pay?

In Finland, income taxes are progressive. That means the more money you earn, the more taxes you’ll pay. Read more about how the system works – and what you’ll get in return – on the taxes and personal finances page.

Can I join a union in Finland?

Yes – Finland is characterised by its high degree of union memberships. Both employees and employers have unions, and agreements between them set the standard for things like wages and working hours.

Where are jobs located in Finland?

Job openings are available across the country. The metropolitan region consisting of Espoo, Helsinki, and Vantaa is the biggest hub. These cities sit side-by-side and have a shared public transportation network. 

 

Other hubs include the fast-growing cities of Tampere, Turku, Lappeenranta, Oulu, Jyväskylä, Kuopio, Lahti, Pori, Vaasa, and Rovaniemi. To learn more about some of these places and the opportunities they have to offer, please visit the cities and municipalities section.

A couple crosses the street in front of a pink Victorian building.

Credits: Julia Kivelä / Finnish Lakeland /Jyväskylä Region

All corners of Finland offer plenty of beauty and culture to soak up.

An aerial view of a snow-covered Finnish city.

Credits: Visit Vaasa

Welcome to a winter wonderland! There are many fun and unique ways to make the most of Finland’s cold-weather months.

Do I need to speak the local language?

It’s usually not a must. Many multinational firms, along with many ICT and gaming companies, are incredibly diverse and communicate entirely in English. Currently, nine out of 10 Finns speak English. 

 

In some cases, though, you might consider taking a language course that focuses on building vocabulary for your specific workplace. And besides benefitting your career, learning the local language is a great way to make friends and get a feel for a country’s culture. 

 

Also, did you know that Swedish is an official language in Finland? Approximately 5% of Finns speak Swedish as their first language. While most native Swedish speakers live on Finland’s western and southern coasts, you can hear the language throughout the country. Most Finns speak at least a bit of both and will switch languages on the fly, depending on who’s in the room. 

 

Ready to take the next step in your career? Search job openings in Finland.